Hall (1984). Glossary. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

Enculturation. The process of learning a culture is called enculturation. The enculturation process usually progresses in stages; six-year-olds are more enculturated than three-year-olds, teenagers have almost completed the process and in many cases are under the impression that they have, which can be a source of tension between them and fully enculturated individuals.” (p 229)

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Hall (1984). Entrainment. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“Viewed in the context of human behavior, time is organization. However, Condon’s insights include much more. For example, the definition of the self is deeply embedded in the rhythmic synchronic process. This is because rhythm is inherent in organization, and therefore has a basic design function in the organization of the personality.” (p 180)

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Hall (1984). The Dance of Life. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“One clue is that the Japanese are more aware of synchrony than the average Westerner. Those tremendous Sumo wrestlers, for example, must synchronize their breathing before the referee will allow the match to begin, and the audience is fully aware of what is happening. In this same vein, Japanese who are conversing will frequently monitor their own breathing in order to stay in sync with their interlocutor!” (p 164)

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Boroditsky (2005). Linguistic Relativity. (Encyclopedia of cognitive science.)

“In recent years, research on linguistic relativity has enjoyed a considerable resurgence, and much new evidence regarding the effects of language on thought has become available. This chapter reviews several lines of evidence regarding the effects of language on people’s representations of space, time, substances, and objects.” (¶ 4)

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Cibelli, Xu, Austerweil, Griffiths, & Regier (2016). The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis and Probabilistic Inference: Evidence from the Domain of Color.

“Thus, this general approach, and our model as an instance of it, offer a possible resolution of one source of controversy surrounding the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis: taking that hypothesis seriously need not entail a wholesale rejection of important universal components of human cognition.” (p 15)

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Boroditsky (2009). How Does Our Language Shape The Way We Think? (What’s Next?: Dispatches on the Future of Science.)

“… English speakers prefer to talk about duration in terms of length (e.g., ‘That was a short talk,’ ‘The meeting didn’t take long‘), while Spanish and Greek speakers prefer to talk about time in terms of amount, relying more on words like ‘much’ ‘big’, and ‘little’ rather than ‘short’ and ‘long’ …” (p 123-124)

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Swoyer (2003). The Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis.

“But what is easy to say in one language may be harder to say in a second, and this may make it easier or more natural or more common for speakers of the first language to think in a certain way than for speakers of the second language to do so. A concept or category may be more available in some linguistic communities than in others.” (¶ 39)

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Hale (1998). On endangered languages and the importance of linguistic diversity.

“The fact is, an enormous body of cultural and intellectual wealth was lost irretrievably in the course of the European colonization of the New World and the South. It was lost utterly and without being noticed, primarily because it was mental wealth, appreciable only through the language which was lost with it.” (p 193)

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Hall (1984). Experiencing Time. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“This principle is illustrated by the way in which we have taken our own biological clocks, moved them outside ourselves, and then treated the extensions as though they represented the only reality. … Because of extension transference, the schedule is the reality and people and their needs are not considered.” (p 131)

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