Vygotsky (1962). The Problem and the Approach. (Thought and Language.)

“… a sign of contemporary Gestalt psychology. In the word we recognized only its external side. Yet it is in the internal aspect, in word meaning, that thought and speech unite into verbal thought.” (p 5-6)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory: Exploring the potential for the ethics of care to provide theoretical justification for patient-centered care.

“… the families’ supporters argue for the importance of valuing traditional healing practices as fundamental cultural values that ought to be preserved and respected no matter what Western medicine might favour or predict.” (p 69)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hall (1984). The Dance of Life. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“One clue is that the Japanese are more aware of synchrony than the average Westerner. Those tremendous Sumo wrestlers, for example, must synchronize their breathing before the referee will allow the match to begin, and the audience is fully aware of what is happening. In this same vein, Japanese who are conversing will frequently monitor their own breathing in order to stay in sync with their interlocutor!” (p 164)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hall (1984). Experiencing Time. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“This principle is illustrated by the way in which we have taken our own biological clocks, moved them outside ourselves, and then treated the extensions as though they represented the only reality. … Because of extension transference, the schedule is the reality and people and their needs are not considered.” (p 131)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Iseechigehina, Planned Actions: Connection to the Process. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“No single teaching approach was used for every class or by every teacher to effectively connect students to the process of learning. Each teacher used a variety of approaches that included mastery learning, concrete materials, storytelling, one-on-one, the talking or sharing circle, group work, and learning that was experiential, community-based, activity-based, or land-based learning.” (p 148)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The use of Indigenous language, patterns of communication, and incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and values in the class created a sense of familiarity and belonging, so that students would be open to learning.” (p 122)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Trust was also related to setting and enforcing clear expectations and boundaries for performance and behaviour. Students needed to trust that a teacher would be firm in dealing with inappropriate behaviour, impose fair consequences, and follow up.” (p 110)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory.

“Health professionals are often encouraged to consider evidence as the guiding source for difficult decision. While evidence-based practice is valuable, medical evidence does not exist outside of the relational context of treatment.” (p 79-80)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Mitchell, Guichon, & Wong (2015). Caring for children, focusing on children.

“A more recent report claims that ‘Racism against Indigenous peoples in the healthcare system is so pervasive that people strategize around anticipated racism before visiting the emergency department or, in some cases, avoid care altogether’ (13).” (p 294)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php