Selwyn (2016). Minding our language: why education and technology is full of bullshit… and what might be done about it.

“Perhaps, we need a language of education and technology that unpacks more aptly the underlying functions of these technologies and exposes their political intent.” (p 441-442)

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Sinclair (2017). Indigenous nationhood can save the world. Here’s how.

“In political events we take time as Anishinaabeg to greet everyone and make sure we know where everyone is from, who they represent and how, and how their responsibilities have brought them to this place.” (¶17)

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Ellul (1964). Chapter 1 – Techniques. (The Technological Society.)

“Technique has become autonomous; it has fashioned an omnivorous world which obeys its own laws and which has renounced all tradition. Technique no longer rests on tradition, but rather on previous technical procedures; and its evolution is too rapid, too upsetting, to integrate the older traditions.” (p 14)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 6 – Women and Wider Values. (The Culture of Technology.)

“The irony is that where agricultural development is planned by governments, this is usually with the aim of directing more farm produce into the market economy. Such policies result in a degree of economic growth, but achieve this by encouraging male farmers with their cash crops — [page break] groundnuts, coffee, cotton — while usually offering no support at all to the female farmers who grow their families’ food.” (p 99-100)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 4 – Beliefs about Resources. (The Culture of Technology.)

“One study group has argued that we have an obligation to future generations to think fifty years ahead, and criticizes most commercial and political planning for its ‘horizon blindness’ beyond about ten years.” (p 67)

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Bowles (2018). The Digital Gap Between Rich and Poor Kids Is Not What We Expected.

“… as Silicon Valley’s parents increasingly panic over the impact screens have on their children and move toward screen-free lifestyles, worries over a new digital divide are rising. It could happen that the children of poorer and middle-class parents will be raised by screens, while the children of Silicon Valley’s elite will be going back to wooden toys and the luxury of human interaction.” (¶4)

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Children’s Screen Time Action Network (2018). Our letter to the APA.

“Persuasive technology is the design[3] of digital devices and apps to influence human thoughts and behavior. While these techniques are used for positive purposes (e.g., more efficient website navigation), they are also employed with the guidance of psychologists and other behavior experts working in the tech industry to persuade users, many of whom are children, to spend long periods of time using social media and video game sites.” (¶4)

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Feenberg (2017). Critical theory of technology and STS.

“The dominant program is materialized in actual technologies through designed-in values and purposes. The dominant actors thus always have the ‘facts’ on their side. The anti-program may be confined at first to discursive expressions such as protests and demands articulating values different from those of the dominant actors. The subordinate actors’ demands usually appear to be unrealistic, ideological, in the face of the ‘facts’.” (p 6)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 2 – Beliefs about Progress. (The Culture of Technology.)

“… primarily, the factory was [page break] an invention concerning the organization of work, with an earlier origin than most of the machines it contained.” (p 18-19)

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Manjikian (2017). Social Construction of Technology: How objects acquire meaning in society. (Technology and World Politics: An Introduction.)

“While engineers physically construct or make an object, interest groups also construct the object — by virtue of the language they use to describe the object, the ways in which it is marketed and sold, and the ways in which it is regulated and understood.” (p 28)

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