Harris (2014). Chapter 2: The Mystery of Consciousness. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“What is most startling about the split-brain phenomenon is that we have every reason to believe that the isolated right hemisphere is independently conscious.” (¶38)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 1: Spirituality. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion).

“Our minds are all we have. They are all we have ever had. And they are all we can offer others. … Every experience you have ever had has been shaped by your mind. Every relationship is as good or as bad as it is because of the minds involved.” (¶5)

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Schirmer, Meck, & Penney (2016). The Socio-Temporal Brain: Connecting People in Time.

“Neuroimaging research has revealed brain regions that are preferentially engaged in social processing. These regions, collectively referred to as the ‘social brain’ [50], activate more strongly when individuals perceive information from or about other people than when they perceive non-human objects. For example, faces, voices, body movements, and human-like touch have all been shown to specifically stimulate the ‘social brain’ [51–53].” (p 765)

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Brook, A. (2016). Kant’s View of the Mind and Consciousness of Self. (The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.)

“The functions crucial for mental, knowledge-generating activity are spatio-temporal processing of, and application of concepts to, sensory inputs. Cognition requires concepts as well as percepts.” (¶7)

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Swoyer (2003). The Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis.

“But what is easy to say in one language may be harder to say in a second, and this may make it easier or more natural or more common for speakers of the first language to think in a certain way than for speakers of the second language to do so. A concept or category may be more available in some linguistic communities than in others.” (¶ 39)

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Beardsley (1973). The American Scientist as Social Activist: Franz Boas, Burt G. Wilder, and the Cause of Racial Justice, 1900-1915.

“Eventually, of course, American science became an active force for racial egalitarianism, but allegedly the shift began only in the late 1920s, reaching its peak in the 1930s, when Nazi brutalities against European Jewry made the inherent dangers of racism more clear. In sum, American scientists were Johnny-come-latelies in advocating racial justice for Negroes.” (p 50)

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