Sinclair (2013). First Thought. (Nindoodemag Bagijiganan: A History Of Anishinaabeg Narrative.)

“… the appropriate acceptance of a bagijigan in Anishinaabemowin is miigwech — often translated as thank you. A clearer translation comes from the verb miigiwe (‘to give’). Miigwech is therefore to give a gift of gratitude and respect for the gift you have received. In other words, miigwech is a bagijigan.” (p 19)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 6 – Women and Wider Values. (The Culture of Technology.)

“The irony is that where agricultural development is planned by governments, this is usually with the aim of directing more farm produce into the market economy. Such policies result in a degree of economic growth, but achieve this by encouraging male farmers with their cash crops — [page break] groundnuts, coffee, cotton — while usually offering no support at all to the female farmers who grow their families’ food.” (p 99-100)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 5 – Imperatives and Creative Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Dickson notes that heavy industry had ‘an almost mystical significance’ in the early years of the Russian revolution, and comments that the ‘significance attached to technology’ under these circumstances often ‘disguises the exploitative and alienating role technology plays’ within industrial societies.” (p 93)

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Said (1994). Chapter 1 – Overlapping Territories, Intertwined Histories. (Culture and Imperialism.)

“The wonder of it is that the schooling for such relatively provincial thought and action is still prevalent, unchecked, uncritically accepted, recurringly replicated in the education of generation after generation. We are all taught to venerate our nations and admire our traditions: we are taught to pursue their interests with toughness and in disregard for other societies. A new and in my opinion appalling tribalism is fracturing societies, separating peoples, promoting greed, bloody conflict, and uninteresting assertions of minor ethnic or group particularity.” (p 20)

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Hale (1998). On endangered languages and the importance of linguistic diversity.

“The fact is, an enormous body of cultural and intellectual wealth was lost irretrievably in the course of the European colonization of the New World and the South. It was lost utterly and without being noticed, primarily because it was mental wealth, appreciable only through the language which was lost with it.” (p 193)

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Spears (2005). Re-Constructing the Colonizer: Self-representation by First Nations Artists.

“Our artistic work is created around an obstacle course of colonial misunderstandings, cultural protocol, ethical concerns, community lateral violence and funding categories which sometimes attempt to determine the ‘Aboriginalness’ of the work.” (p 128)

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Benjamin (2006). The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.

“For the first time in the process of pictorial reproduction, photography freed the hand of the most important artistic functions which henceforth devolved only upon the eye looking into a lens. Since the eye perceives more swiftly than the hand can draw, the process of pictorial reproduction was accelerated so enormously that it could keep pace with speech.” (p 19-20)

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