Harris (2014). Chapter 5: Gurus, Death, Drugs, and Other Puzzles. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“Everything we do is for the purpose of altering consciousness. We form friendships so that we can feel love and avoid loneliness. We eat specific foods to enjoy their fleeting presence on our tongues. We read for the pleasure of thinking another person’s thoughts. Every waking moment — and even in our dreams — we struggle to direct the flow of sensation, emotion, and cognition toward states of consciousness that we value.” (¶88)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 2 – Beliefs about Progress. (The Culture of Technology.)

“… primarily, the factory was [page break] an invention concerning the organization of work, with an earlier origin than most of the machines it contained.” (p 18-19)

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Manjikian (2017). Social Construction of Technology: How objects acquire meaning in society. (Technology and World Politics: An Introduction.)

“While engineers physically construct or make an object, interest groups also construct the object — by virtue of the language they use to describe the object, the ways in which it is marketed and sold, and the ways in which it is regulated and understood.” (p 28)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 4: Meditation. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“A review of the psychological literature suggests that mindfulness in particular fosters many components of physical and mental health: It improves immune function, blood pressure, and cortisol levels; it reduces anxiety, depression, neuroticism, and emotional reactivity. It also leads to greater behavioral regulation and has shown promise in the treatment of addiction and eating disorders. Unsurprisingly, the practice is associated with increased subjective well-being. Training in compassion meditation increases empathy, as measured by the ability to accurately judge the emotions of others, as well as positive affect in the presence of suffering. The practice of mindfulness has been shown to have similar pro-social effects.” (¶8)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 1 – Technology: Practice and Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Yet those who operate these levers of power are able to do so partly because they can exploit deeper values relating to the so-called technological imperative, and to the basic creativity that makes innovation possible. This, I argue, is central part of the culture of technology …” (p 12)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 3: The Riddle of the Self. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“The sense that we are unified subjects is a fiction, produced by a multitude of separate processes and structures of which we are not aware and over which we exert no conscious control.” (¶95)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 2: The Mystery of Consciousness. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“What is most startling about the split-brain phenomenon is that we have every reason to believe that the isolated right hemisphere is independently conscious.” (¶38)

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Simon (2018). Delete Your Account Now: A Conversation with Jaron Lanier.

“They are these other people who decide, called advertisers — or I prefer to call them manipulators, because they have been sold on the idea that they’re not just advertising. They’re not just getting a message in front of you, but are part of a mathematical scheme that will predictably addict you and then modify your behavior.” (¶10)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 1: Spirituality. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion).

“Our minds are all we have. They are all we have ever had. And they are all we can offer others. … Every experience you have ever had has been shaped by your mind. Every relationship is as good or as bad as it is because of the minds involved.” (¶5)

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Schirmer, Meck, & Penney (2016). The Socio-Temporal Brain: Connecting People in Time.

“Neuroimaging research has revealed brain regions that are preferentially engaged in social processing. These regions, collectively referred to as the ‘social brain’ [50], activate more strongly when individuals perceive information from or about other people than when they perceive non-human objects. For example, faces, voices, body movements, and human-like touch have all been shown to specifically stimulate the ‘social brain’ [51–53].” (p 765)

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