Goulet & Goulet (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

Goulet, L. M., & Goulet, K. N. (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. In Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies (pp. 197–217). University of British Columbia Press.

[“Situating the Story” (p 197) …]

“Real equity can be achieved in Indigenous education only when a principle of equalization is adopted, so that we have equality in staff salaries and benefits as well as infrastructure, including up-to-date technologies; quality curriculum resources, including those that support Indigenous languages and cultures; specialized programming to support students with special needs; and access to specialized programs to expand student life choices in science, sports, and the arts.” (p 198)

“However, one of the contradictions of schooling is while it can be an institution of colonization, it also has the potential to decolonize (Smith 2000) and support the development of self-determination for Indigenous students and their communities.” (p 200)

[“Indigenizing and Decolonizing Education” (p 200) …]

[“Holistic Teaching” (p 200) …]

[“Intellectual Domain” (p 201) …]

[“Physical Domain” (p 201) …]

“As evident in their term for _life_, _pimatsiwin_, movement is seen by the Nehinuw as foundational. To the Nehinuw, movement and action are part of their philosophy and belief systems, including learning.” (p 203)

[“Socio-Emotional Domain” (p 203) …]

“Western educational theory tends to trivialize emotion, advocating objectivity and unemotional detachment in professional relationships.” (p 203)

“At the same time, when teachers express their emotions, it demonstrates to the learner that the teacher is vulnerable and is ‘as human as the learner’ (Freire 1998, 48).” (p 204)

[“Spiritual Domain” (p 204) …]

[“The Interconnection of the Four Domains” (p 205) …]

[“Relationships Are Foundational” (p 207) …]

[“The Enactment of Nehinuw Relational Concepts” (p 208) …]

“On the land, in service to others, or in community research to solve real life scientific or social problems, learning in community develops students’ knowledge in context and can make a contribution to the community — bringing real meaning to learning.” (p 210)

[“The Enactment of Nehinuw Concepts of Teaching” (p 210) …]

“Initially, his students were not confident in their math abilities, so self-teaching provided them with privacy, taking away the fear of ‘appearing dumb’ to their fellow students and the teacher, so they could engage with the math material.” (p 211)

[“Addressing Power Relationships” (p 212) …]

“Decolonization is about restructuring power imbalances in relationships (Bishop 2003, 2012). … Paradise (1994, 60) … every classroom constructs its own particular social arrangement of ‘domination or respect.'” (p 212)

“Creating equity in power relationships decolonized the learning environment through the development of student freedom and expression.” (p 213)

[“Ininee Mamitoneneetumowin (Indigenous Thinking)” (p 214) …]

 

Selected References

  • Bishop, Russell. 2003. “Changing power relations in education: Kaupapa Maori messages for ‘mainstream’ education in Aotearoa/New Zealand.” Comparative Education 39 (2): 221–38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03050060302555.
  • Freire, Paulo. 1998. Teachers as cultural workers: Letters to those who dare teach. Trans. Donaldo Macedo, D. Koike, and Alexandre Olivira. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  • Paradise, Ruth. 1994. “Spontaneous cultural compatibility: Mazahua students and their teacher constructing trusting relations.” Peabody Journal of Education 69 (2): 60–70. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01619569409538765.
  • Smith, Graham Hingandaroa. 2000. “Maori education: Revolution and transformative action.” Canadian Journal of Native Education 24 (1): 57–72.
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