Rinaldo, Tapp, & Laverie (2011). Learning by tweeting: Using Twitter as a pedagogical tool.

Rinaldo, S. B., Tapp, S., & Laverie, D. A. (2011). Learning by tweeting: Using Twitter as a pedagogical tool. Journal of Marketing Education, 33(2), 193-203. doi:10.1177/0273475311410852

[Authentic learning?]

“… experiential learning …” (p 193)

“Junco, Heibergert, and Loken (2011) published the first experimental evidence suggesting that Twitter use was responsible for enhancing student grade point averages and creating higher engagement for both students and faculty. Our study extends these findings by applying Kolb’s (1984) model of experiential learning to demonstrate Twitter’s role in student involvement, satisfaction, career preparation, and educational goals.” (p 193)

[communications transparency (p 194)]

“As Twitter evolved from its original focus on broadcasting personal activity to a real-time source of consumer-to-consumer recommendations, it changed its prompt from ‘What are you doing?’ to ‘What’s happening?'” (p 194)

“… with Web 2.0 tools, especially social networking tools. Researchers differentiate between friendship-driven and interest-driven social networking tools. Twitter is interest based and lends itself well to experiential learning since it is less bounded as a community compared with Facebook (Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009a).” (p 194)

[Figure 1. Kolb’s model of experiential learning (Kolb, 1984)] (p 195)

“Students’ perceptions of Twitter’s overall benefit increased throughout the semester …, as did perceptions that Twitter had positive time/benefit … . Likewise, student perceptions of Twitter’s role in enhancing educational goals also increased over the period … . … Perceptions of Twitter’s overall benefit increased … . Perceptions of Twitter’s role in enhancing educational goals increased significantly … as did the perceived time/benefit ratio … .” (p 197)

“Students who said they used Twitter indicated that use aided a high level of involvement in the course …, overall satisfaction with the course …, career preparation …, and traditional educational goals … . Likewise, users were more likely to say that Twitter led to good use of class time …, to have more positive reactions overall …, and to see more benefits for the course … .” (p 198)

“… when students are inexperienced with a technology such as Twitter in the classroom, their perceptions move in a positive direction over the course of the semester. … the perceived benefit was higher for students who reported higher use of the technology, supporting Kolb’s (1984) model of experiential learning, where knowledge is created through experience.” (p 198)

“Second, the professor recognized that students may be more likely to use Twitter with additional instruction on Twitter’s features … Thus, through experience and reflection, students could generalize and apply their knowledge (Kolb, 1984).”

“This instrument measured personal involvement and satisfaction …, perceived career preparation …, perceived traditional educational goals .., perceived use of class time and benefit to time ratio …, and students’ overall reactions to and attitudes about the use of Twitter in the course … .” (p 199)

“Students who said they used Twitter indicated that use aided a high level of involvement in the course …, overall satisfaction with the course …, career preparation …, and traditional educational goals … . Likewise, users were more likely to say that Twitter led to good use of class time …, to have more positive reactions overall …, and to see more benefits for the course … .” (p 199)

“Those high on innovativeness indicated that Twitter contributed to a higher level of involvement in the course …” (p 199)

“… how the professor used the technology did not change the overall perceived benefit at the end of the semester. Rather, the experiential learning process was what was important.” (p 200)

“‘[Twitter] allowed me to trade articles and thoughts with [the professor] in a much more informal way than e-mail would allow.”” (p 200)

“Thus, more emphasis on the reflection component of Kolb’s (1984) model may be beneficial.” (p 201)

“Regardless of quantity or content of tweets, benefits of Twitter use were perceived by the students. Furthermore, the highest benefits were perceived by students who reported using the technology most.” (p 201)

“This indicates that users, even those who may not adopt the technology otherwise, benefited from the technology in the classroom.”(p 201)

“Some of the difficulty and intimidation with using Twitter appears to be related to the transition from other types of social media.” (p 202)

“… polling in the classroom…” (p 202)

“… student resistance to using Twitter is a primary barrier to student adoption.” (p 202)

[Mention of privacy, confidentiality (p 202)]

” evidence of the positive effects of social media use in this and other studies (see Junco et al., 2011) suggest that when used well, social media has the potential to increase student engagement, involvement, satisfaction, and grades as well as to prepare them for employment in today’s social media-rich marketing world. Social media can be a good way to engage students in experiential learning.” (p 203)

Selected references

  • Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 40(7), 3-7.
  • Dunlap, J. C., & Lowenthal, P. R. (2009a). Horton hears a tweet. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 32(4), 1-11.
  • Junco, R., Heibergert, G., & Loken, E. (2011). The effect of Twitter on college student engagement and grades. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27, 119-132.
  • Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

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