Goulet & Goulet (2014). Iseechigehina, Planned Actions: Connection to the Process. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“No single teaching approach was used for every class or by every teacher to effectively connect students to the process of learning. Each teacher used a variety of approaches that included mastery learning, concrete materials, storytelling, one-on-one, the talking or sharing circle, group work, and learning that was experiential, community-based, activity-based, or land-based learning.” (p 148)

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Yao (2017). The Western Elite from a Chinese Perspective.

“What I realized is that if we look at one individual’s life in isolation, it is very tempting to come to the conclusion that one’s particular actions lead to whatever happens next. But if we look at the society as a whole or look across generations, we can see that people with very similar backgrounds can take similar actions and end up with vastly different results.” (¶38)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The use of Indigenous language, patterns of communication, and incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and values in the class created a sense of familiarity and belonging, so that students would be open to learning.” (p 122)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Trust was also related to setting and enforcing clear expectations and boundaries for performance and behaviour. Students needed to trust that a teacher would be firm in dealing with inappropriate behaviour, impose fair consequences, and follow up.” (p 110)

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Hall (1984). Different Streams. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“I soon learned that I was dealing with at least four different time systems: Hopi time, Navajo time, government bureaucratic time, and the time used by the other white men (mostly Indian traders) who lived on the reservation. There was also Eastern tourist time, banker’s time (when notes were due), and many other variations of the white man’s time system.” (p 29)

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Hall (1984). How Many Kinds of Time? (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“In my approach, behavior comes first and words follow. Looking at what people actually do (in contrast to what they write and say when theorizing) one quickly discovers a wide discrepancy between time as it is lived and time as it is considered.” (p 13)

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Brumble (1998). Vine Deloria, Jr., Creationism, and Ethnic Pseudoscience.

“I do want to point out that Deloria, the creationists, and the melanin scholars differ importantly from scientists. Deloria et al. are fundamentally antirational — even as they try to wrap the mantle of science about their beliefs.” (p 341)

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Meier (2017). UC Berkeley Uses Optical Scanning to Recover Indigenous Voices from Wax Cylinders.

“A project underway at UC Berkeley is using innovative optical scan technology to transfer and digitally restore these recordings … ‘Documenting Endangered Languages,’ … aims to preserve about 100 hours of audio.” (¶2)

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